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Plants & Animals news

Timing is everything – for plants too

Organisms differ in their morphology between species, within species and even within individuals at different stages of development. Researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Plant Breeding Research in Cologne, Germany, ...

dateAug 18, 2015 in Plants & Animals
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Fallow deer are all about the bass when sizing up rivals

During the deer's breeding season, or rut, the researchers from Queen Mary University of London (QMUL) and ETH Zürich, played male fallow deer (bucks) in Petworth Park in West Sussex, a variety of different calls that had ...

Apes may be closer to speaking than many scientists think

Koko the gorilla is best known for a lifelong study to teach her a silent form of communication, American Sign Language. But some of the simple sounds she has learned may change the perception that humans are the only primates ...

Caterpillar chemical turns ants into bodyguards

A trio of researchers with Kobe University in Japan has found that lycaenid butterfly caterpillars of the Japanese oakblue variety, have dorsal nectary organ secretions that cause ants that eat the material to abandon their ...

Sundew discovery on Facebook makes plant science news

A new species of sundew has been discovered on Facebook. The find is a carnivorous sundew, Drosera magnifica. The new discovery comes from a single mountaintop in southeastern Brazil—the largest New World sundew.

How do ants identify different members of their society?

Ants, which are eusocial insects, have intrigued scientists for long as a model for cooperation inside a colony where they nurse the young, gather food and defend against intruders. Most recently, ants have been shown to ...

Predators might not be dazzled by stripes

Stripes might not offer protection for animals living in groups, such as zebra, as previously thought, according to research published in Frontiers in Zoology. Humans playing a computer game captured striped targets more ...

Some honeybee colonies adapt in wake of deadly mites
Study hints at why parrots are great vocal imitators
Pupil shape linked to animals' ecological niche
Kiwi bird genome sequenced
Injured jellyfish seek to regain symmetry, study shows
Researchers discover a new deep-sea fish species
Why the seahorse's tail is square
How bees naturally vaccinate their babies
Nerves found to exist in male spider genitalia
New lizard named after Sir David Attenborough
Shedding light on millipede evolution

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