Taking the bite out of snake venom

According to the World Health Organization, about 100,000 people die from venomous snakebites every year. Many of these fatalities occur in rural areas of developing countries that lack access to antivenoms. That's why researchers ...

Variable venom—why are some snakes deadlier than others?

An international collaboration led by scientists from the National University of Ireland, Galway, The University of St Andrews, Trinity College Dublin and the Zoological Society of London has uncovered why the venom of some ...

Nanoparticles to treat snakebites

Venomous snakebites affect 2.5 million people, and annually cause more than 100,000 deaths and leave 400,000 individuals with permanent physical and psychological trauma each year. Researchers reporting in PLOS Neglected ...

Why are some animals venomous?

Some animals, such as venomous snakes and insects, can use venom for predation or defense, which is an ability that has been developed through millions of years. And the evolution continues – partly due to an increasing ...

Mysteries of Okinawan habu venom decoded

It is more likely to see a habu snake in a bottle of Okinawan rice liquor than to see one slithering by the wayside. Even so, habus are very common in the Ryukyu islands, of which Okinawa is a part. Okinawa is home to three ...

What you should do if bitten by a snake

The most dangerous snake you are likely to meet in northern Europe are vipers and grass snakes, which are generally only dangerous to children and dogs.

Okinawan pit viper genome reveals evolution of snake venom

A bite from a pit viper, locally known as habu, can cause permanent disability and even death. Yet, much about its venom remains an enigma. Highly variable in composition, even between littermates, this toxic cocktail keeps ...

page 2 from 8