Buzz kill: mass bee deaths sting Russian beekeepers

Anatoly Rubtsov looked despondently at the beehives lining his property. "The farm used to be loud, it sang," he said. Today just a faint buzz is audible but an overpowering rotting stench hung in the air after his bees were ...

How pesticides change the environment

The number of humans on the planet has almost doubled in the past 50 years ‒ and so has global food production. As a result, the use of pesticides and their effect on humans, animals and plants have become more important. ...

Study helps threatened wheat crops in Asia, Africa

Researchers at Oregon State University have helped develop new environmental monitoring technology that will allow farmers thousands of miles away, in west and central Asia, to save millions of dollars while more effectively ...

Wildlife losses now stabilising

Efforts to conserve biodiversity in the UK, Belgium and Netherlands may be working, despite the widespread perception that wildlife is in terminal decline, a new study suggests.

Europe set to ban bee-killing pesticides (Update)

The European Commission received the go-ahead Monday to slap a two-year ban across the European Union on the use of pesticides blamed for a sharp decline in bee populations, an EU diplomat said.

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