Green earplugs

Through the window, you hear the traffic noise from down the street, a train rumbles in the distance—that is the everyday life for many of us. Almost 75% of the European population lives in urban areas and only a quarter ...

Trees bring benefits to society, regardless of their origin

Trees planted in urban spaces provide a multitude of ecosystem services: they reduce air pollution and noise, provide habitat and shelter for other species, and reduce erosion during heavy rains. They also offer opportunities ...

Planning greener, healthier cities from the data up

A new study by the University of South Australia indicates important gaps in urban planning data need to be addressed to ensure key development decisions are evidence-based.

High human population density negative for pollinators

Population density, and not the proportion of green spaces, has the biggest impact on species richness of pollinators in residential areas. This is the result of a study from Lund University in Sweden of gardens and residential ...

Why urban density is good for health – even during a pandemic

Disease outbreaks shape our cities. Public health concerns have influenced some of the most iconic developments in urban planning. London's sewage systems were developed in response to cholera outbreaks in the 19th century. ...

If it's big enough and leafy enough the birds will come

A new study from the Cornell Lab of Ornithology highlights specific features of urban green spaces that support the greatest diversity of bird species. The findings were published today in the journal Landscape and Urban ...

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