Analyzing employment trends through cell phone data

Policymakers now have another tool in their arsenal to help recognize and respond quickly to economic shocks. A new research study co-authored by Harvard Kennedy School Assistant Professor Daniel Shoag finds that call detail ...

Researchers use mobile phone data to predict employment shocks

Northeastern University computational social scientist David Lazer and his interdisciplinary research team have demonstrated that mobile phone data can be used to quickly and accurately detect, track, and predict changes ...

Recessions result in lower birth rates in the long run

While it is largely understood that birth rates plummet when unemployment rates soar, the long-term effects have never been clear. Now, new research from Princeton University's Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International ...

Will the real unemployment rate please stand up?

America's unemployment rate—most recently reported as 6.1 percent—has long been used to gauge the country's economic well-being. But a new working paper released by Princeton University's Woodrow Wilson School of Public ...

Hartz IV reform did not reduce unemployment in Germany

The Hartz IV reform of the German labor market has been one of the most controversial reforms in the history of the reunited Federal Republic of Germany. It has been widely seen as the end of the welfare state leading into ...

Lack of worker skills threatens European recovery (Update 2)

Andrea Ortiz, a 24-year-old Spaniard, has degrees in law and business yet works in a multinational clothing company as a store clerk. She has little hope of advancement and fears that when finally she does get a job she wants, ...

Poverty stuck at 15 percent—record 46.5 million

The nation's poverty rate remained stuck at 15 percent last year despite America's slowly reviving economy, a discouraging lack of improvement for the record 46.5 million poor and an unwelcome benchmark for President Barack ...

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