Study traces evolution of acoustic communication

Imagine taking a hike through a forest or a stroll through a zoo and not a sound fills the air, other than the occasional chirp from a cricket. No birds singing, no tigers roaring, no monkeys chattering, and no human voices, ...

New 'umbrella' species would massively improve conservation

The protection of Australia's threatened species could be improved by a factor of seven, if more efficient 'umbrella' species were prioritized for protection, according to University of Queensland research.

The Paleozoic diet: Why animals eat what they eat

In what is likely the first study to look at how dietary preferences evolved across the animal kingdom, UA researchers looked at more than a million species, going back 800 million years. The team reports several unexpected ...

On the land, one-quarter of vertebrates die because of humans

Humans have a "disproportionately huge effect" on the other species of vertebrates that share Earth's surface with us, causing more than 25 percent of the deaths among an array of species all over the globe, according to ...

The effects of anthropogenic noise

Hans Slabbekoorn, researcher at the Institute of Biology Leiden, is one of the editors of the latest volume of the Springer Handbook of Auditory Research (SHAR). This book is filled with everything known about the effects ...

The Karoo Basin and the end Permian mass extinction

Earth's biosphere witnessed its greatest ecological catastrophe in the latest Permian, dated to about 251.9 million years ago. The current model for biodiversity collapse states that both marine and terrestrial animals were ...

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