The sticky science of underwater adhesives

Mussels stick to rocks on the seafloor, to aquatic plants, and—to the consternation of boaters—they can hitch rides fastened to seafaring vessels no matter their composition: metals, rubber, glass, wood and more.

Mussel-inspired coatings for drug delivery

Nature is full of wonderful, time-tested solutions to different challenges. Science has turned its attention to reproducing and repurposing these phenomena to create more sustainable responses to human challenges. This relatively ...

Protein mimic shows promise as tissue engineering glue

Researchers have demonstrated the potential of a "synthetic protein mimic" to promote the adhesion of brain cells in a laboratory setting. This feat could help overcome a major challenge in nerve tissue engineering.

Protein glue shows potential for use with biomaterials

Researchers at the University of Milan in Italy have shown that a synthetic protein called AGMA1 has the potential to promote the adhesion of brain cells in a laboratory setting. This could prove helpful in improving cell ...

Mussels inspire innovative new adhesive for surgery

(Phys.org)—Mussels can be a mouthwatering meal, but the chemistry that lets mussels stick to underwater surfaces may also provide a highly adhesive wound closure and more effective healing from surgery.

Inspired by gecko feet, scientists invent super-adhesive material

For years, biologists have been amazed by the power of gecko feet, which let these 5-ounce lizards produce an adhesive force roughly equivalent to carrying nine pounds up a wall without slipping. Now, a team of polymer scientists ...

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