Related topics: bacteria

Algal symbiosis could shed light on dark ocean

New research has revealed a surprise twist in the symbiotic relationship between a type of salamander and the alga that lives inside its eggs. A new paper in Frontiers in Microbiology reports that the eggs compete with the ...

Knock-knock? Who's there? How coral let symbiotic algae in

New work from a team of Carnegie cell, genomic and developmental biologists solves a longstanding marine science mystery that could aid coral conservation. The researchers identified the type of cell that enables a soft coral ...

Two bacteria allow spittlebugs to thrive on low-nutrient meals

A new study examines the symbiotic relationship between two types of bacteria and spittlebugs that helps the insect live on very low-nutrient food. The bacteria use a metabolic "trick" also employed by cancer cells to create ...

New database reveals plants' secret relationships with fungi

Leiden researchers have compiled information collected by scientists over the past 120 years into a database of plant-fungal interactions. This important biological data is now freely available for researchers and nature ...

Hornwort genomes could lead to crop improvement

Some 500 million years ago—when our continents were likely connected in a single land mass and most life existed underwater—hornworts were one of the first groups of plants to colonize land. But biologists have never ...

Fungal diversity and its relationship to the future of forests

If you indulge in truffles, or porcini and chanterelle mushrooms, you have enjoyed a product of ectomycorrhizal fungi. Forming symbiotic relationships with plants—including pine, birch, oak and willow tree species—these ...

How do corals make the most of their symbiotic algae?

Corals depend on their symbiotic relationships with the algae that they host. But how do they keep algal population growth in check? The answer to this fundamental question could help reefs survive in a changing climate.

Who controls whom: Algae or sea anemone?

Bleached anemones—those lacking symbiotic algae—do not move toward light, a behavior exhibited by healthy, symbiotic anemones. Published in Coral Reefs, this finding from Carnegie's Shawna Foo, Arthur Grossman, and Ken ...

page 1 from 10