Glycans found binding to mammalian RNA

A team of researchers at Stanford University has found evidence of glycans binding with mammalian RNA. The group has written a paper describing their findings and have posted it on the bioRxiv preprint server.

Sweet! How C. difficile toxin A enters intestinal cells

Clostridiodes difficile infection has become a leading cause of severe, sometimes fatal diarrheal illness. It flourishes best in hospitals and long-term care facilities where people are on long-term antibiotic treatment, ...

Unusual sugar from cyanobacteria acts as natural herbicide

Researchers at the University of Tübingen have discovered a natural substance that could compete with the controversial herbicide glyphosate: a newly discovered sugar molecule synthesized from cyanobacteria that inhibits ...

How a molecular signal helps plant cells decide when to make oil

A study at the U.S. Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory identifies new details of how a sugar-signaling molecule helps regulate oil production in plant cells. As described in a paper appearing in the journal ...

Chemists develop contaminant detection technique for heparin

In 2008, a contaminant eluded the quality safeguards in the pharmaceutical industry and infiltrated a large portion of the supply of the popular blood thinner heparin, sickening hundreds and killing about 100 in the U.S.

Water may be key to understanding sweetness

A cranberry, honey or a candy bar—which tastes the sweetest? These foods contain sugars that humans can perceive differently. A cranberry seems tart, whereas a candy bar can be excessively sweet, and honey is somewhere ...

Sleeping sickness parasites camouflage themselves with sugar

It has long been known that the pathogens causing sleeping sickness evade the immune system by exchanging their surface proteins. But now scientists at the German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ) have found an additional parasite ...

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