How do our cells respond to stress?

Cells are often exposed to stressful conditions that can be life threatening, such as high temperatures or toxins. Fortunately, our cells are masters of stress management with a powerful response program: they cease to grow, ...

Network of protein-RNA interaction guides phase separation

St. Jude Children's Research Hospital investigators are studying the details of how phase separation leads to the formation of RNA granules, assemblies of protein and RNA that are not bound by a membrane. Their findings show ...

Molecular networks serve as cellular blueprints

Networks are at the heart of everything from communications systems to pandemics. Now researchers have found that a unique type of network also underlies the structures of critical cellular compartments known as membraneless ...

Mysterious m6A marks on RNA begin to yield their secrets

Chemical modifications that appear on some RNA transcripts may have evolved in part to help cells repair themselves after damage, and may also be a key to understanding important human diseases, according to new research ...

Evading cell death

Cancer cells can develop resistance to the treatments designed to eliminate them. Several studies have linked stress granules (SGs), cell organelles that form transiently in response to extracellular stress, to this phenomenon. ...

Study expands possibilities for treating neurological diseases

Researchers in Japan have gained valuable insights into 'stress granules'—clumps of RNAs and proteins that form when cells are stressed by factors such as heat, toxins and viruses, deepening the understanding of proteins ...

The big clean up after stress

Toxic substances, nutrient shortage, viral infection, heat and many other events trigger stress responses in cells. In such cases, the affected cells launch a programme which tries to protect them against stress-related damages. ...

Jumping genes have essential biological functions

"Alu" sequences are small repetitive elements representing about 10% of our genome. Because of their ability to move around the genome, these "jumping genes" are considered as real motors of evolution. However, they were ...

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