Microbe chews through PFAS and other tough contaminants

In a series of lab tests, a relatively common soil bacterium has demonstrated its ability to break down the difficult-to-remove class of pollutants called PFAS, researchers at Princeton University said.

Soil health can combat climate change from the ground up

Five months after devastating spring flooding across the Midwest, farms along the Missouri River remain under water. This summer, severe drought has hit patches of Texas and Oklahoma. Areas of the West and Southeast are abnormally ...

NASA studies how arctic wildfires change the world

Wildfires in the Arctic often burn far away from populated areas, but their impacts are felt around the globe. From field and laboratory work to airborne campaigns and satellites, NASA is studying why boreal forests and tundra ...

Farmers and food companies hit the dirt to improve soil health

Big food brands, such as Kellogg, Campbell, Mars Wrigley and General Mills, have started investing in their ingredients by helping farmers improve soil health and sustainability. Not only do these programs enable companies ...

Natural environments favor 'good' bacteria

A new study has shown that restoring environments to include a wider range of species can promote "good" bacteria over "bad"—with potential benefits for human health.

Clover improves soil quality, feeds biofuels crop

A four-leaf clover might bring good luck, but a stand of Kura clover can produce healthier soil—in the long run, according to a South Dakota State University study.

Earthworm research spurs farmers to act

A study of England's farmland has found key earthworm types are rare or absent in two out of five fields and has led to the majority of farmers affected vowing to change the way they farm.

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