Vulnerability for at-risk populations identified in US influenza data

A next-generation system for monitoring influenza outbreaks performs well overall, but reveals a critical lack of sufficient data to accurately monitor influenza in the most at-risk communities. Samuel V. Scarpino of Northeastern ...

Number of Australians facing housing stress doubles

The number of Australians who couldn't pay their rent or mortgage on time has more than doubled due to COVID-19, new data from The Australian National University (ANU) shows.

The future of work will hit vulnerable people the hardest

A great deal of attention is being paid to the future of work and its impact on Canadians. Often missing from the discussion is the extent to which different workers will be included or excluded from the changing labor market.

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Socioeconomic status

Socioeconomic status (SES) is an economic and sociological combined total measure of a person's work experience and of an individual's or family’s economic and social position relative to others, based on income, education, and occupation. When analyzing a family’s SES, the household income earners' education and occupation are examined, as well as combined income, versus with an individual, when their own attributes are assessed.

Socioeconomic status is typically broken into three categories, high SES, middle SES, and low SES to describe the three areas a family or an individual may fall into. When placing a family or individual into one of these categories any or all of the three variables (income, education, and occupation) can be assessed.

A fourth variable, wealth, may also be examined when determining socioeconomic status.

Additionally, income, occupation and education have shown to be strong predictors of a range of physical and mental health problems, ranging from respiratory viruses, arthritis, coronary disease, and schizophrenia.

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