Natural disasters contribute to holiday travel delays

Holiday travel is stressful enough—we know we're supposed to arrive at the airport early, give extra time to drive places, and expect delays. But what about checking the weather on the other side of the country, routing ...

Combining satellites, radar provides path for better forecasts

Every minute counts when it comes to predicting severe weather. Combing data from cutting-edge geostationary satellites and traditional weather radar created a path toward earlier, more accurate warnings, according to Penn ...

Using artificial intelligence to better predict severe weather

When forecasting weather, meteorologists use a number of models and data sources to track shapes and movements of clouds that could indicate severe storms. However, with increasingly expanding weather data sets and looming ...

Community impacts from extreme weather shape climate beliefs

Recent studies have suggested that people who experience the impacts of hurricanes, catastrophic flooding or other severe weather events are more likely to believe in, and be concerned about, climate change in the wake of ...

Climate change a threat to even the most tolerant oysters

Climate change-associated severe weather events may cause flooding that threatens the survival of the Olympia oyster, new research suggests. The findings will be presented today at the American Physiological Society's (APS) ...

New weather model could increase tornado-warning times

Penn State researchers are the first to use data obtained from recent next-generation satellites in a numerical weather-prediction model used to provide guidance for tornadic thunderstorm forecasting.

NOAA's GOES-16 ready to improve forecasts even more

Now in its new GOES-East position, the advanced GOES-16 satellite has officially joined NOAA's operational observation network, providing forecasters with sharper, more defined images of severe storms, hurricanes, wildfires ...

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