Related topics: earthquake

Marine extremophiles: The basal level of the food chain

In nutrient-poor deep-sea sediments, microbes belonging to Archaea have outcompeted bacterial microorganisms for millions of years. Efficiently scavenging dead cells makes them the basal producers in the food chain.

New study shows legacy of DDT to lake ecosystems

New findings of a multi-university research team show the pesticide DDT persists in remote lakes at concerning levels half a century after it was banned, affecting key aquatic species and potentially entire lake food webs.

Glacial sediments greased the gears of plate tectonics

Earth's outer layer is composed of giant plates that grind together, sliding past or dipping beneath one another, giving rise to earthquakes and volcanoes. These plates also separate at undersea mountain ridges, where molten ...

Researchers find seaweed helps trap carbon dioxide in sediment

Every beachgoer can spot seaweed in the ocean or piling up on the beach, but Florida State University researchers working with colleagues in the United Kingdom have found that these slimy macroalgae play an important role ...

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Sediment

Sediment is any particulate matter that can be transported by fluid flow, and which eventually is deposited.

Sediments are most often transported by water (fluvial processes) transported by wind (aeolian processes) and glaciers. Beach sands and river channel deposits are examples of fluvial transport and deposition, though sediment also often settles out of slow-moving or standing water in lakes and oceans. Desert sand dunes and loess are examples of aeolian transport and deposition. Glacial moraine deposits and till are ice transported sediments.

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