Related topics: earthquake

Hurricane Nicole sheds light on how storms impact deep ocean

In early October 2016, a tropical storm named Nicole formed in the middle of the Atlantic Ocean. It roamed for six days, reaching Category 4 hurricane status with powerful 140 mile-per hour-winds, before hitting the tiny ...

Europe's oldest lake traces 1.36 million years of climate

By analysing sediment cores from the bed of Europe's oldest lake, an international team of scientists has created a detailed climate history of the north-central Mediterranean stretching back 1.36 million years—and revealed ...

How coastal mud holds the key to climate cooling gas

Bacteria found in muddy marshes, estuaries and coastal sediment synthesise one of the Earth's most abundant climate cooling gases—according to new research from the University of East Anglia (UEA).

Coral host responses to heat and sediment stress

NUS marine ecologists have discovered changes in the gene expression of corals subjected to short-term heat and sediment stress which provide critical insights for more effective reef management strategies.

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Sediment

Sediment is any particulate matter that can be transported by fluid flow, and which eventually is deposited.

Sediments are most often transported by water (fluvial processes) transported by wind (aeolian processes) and glaciers. Beach sands and river channel deposits are examples of fluvial transport and deposition, though sediment also often settles out of slow-moving or standing water in lakes and oceans. Desert sand dunes and loess are examples of aeolian transport and deposition. Glacial moraine deposits and till are ice transported sediments.

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