Related topics: earthquake

Microbes likely form magnetite in the South China Sea

Magnetite, the most magnetic mineral on Earth, is increasingly being found in seafloor environments that are rich in iron and have high methane flux. But how it forms in such settings—whether by microbes that thrive near ...

Unveiling 1,200 years of human occupation in Canada's Arctic

A recent study provides new insights into ancient cultures in Canada's Arctic, focusing on Paleo-Inuit and Thule-Inuit peoples over thousands of years. Jules Blais, professor of biology at the University of Ottawa, and a ...

Sediments reveal the ancient ocean during a mass extinction event

About 183 million years ago, volcanic activity in modern South Africa unleashed an estimated 20,500 gigatons of carbon dioxide (CO2) into the ocean–atmosphere system over a period of 300 to 500 thousand years. Known as ...

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Sediment

Sediment is any particulate matter that can be transported by fluid flow, and which eventually is deposited.

Sediments are most often transported by water (fluvial processes) transported by wind (aeolian processes) and glaciers. Beach sands and river channel deposits are examples of fluvial transport and deposition, though sediment also often settles out of slow-moving or standing water in lakes and oceans. Desert sand dunes and loess are examples of aeolian transport and deposition. Glacial moraine deposits and till are ice transported sediments.

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