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Evidence of slash-and-burn cultivation during the Mesolithic

As early as 9,500 years ago, people in Europe used slash-and-burn methods to make land usable for agriculture. This is shown by environmental data generated by scientists from the Senckenberg Center for Human Evolution and ...

Researchers lay out a path to saving the Mekong Delta

Nearly 20 million people live in Southeast Asia's Mekong Delta, which is also the source of 7–10% of internationally traded rice. But the delta will be nearly entirely underwater by the end of the century if water management ...

Why some beaches are getting bigger despite rising sea levels

In a warmer world, rising sea levels could render many coastlines, beaches, and reef islands uninhabitable, or destroy them altogether. The 1.09℃ Earth has warmed since pre-industrial times has already heightened seas by ...

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Sediment

Sediment is any particulate matter that can be transported by fluid flow, and which eventually is deposited.

Sediments are most often transported by water (fluvial processes) transported by wind (aeolian processes) and glaciers. Beach sands and river channel deposits are examples of fluvial transport and deposition, though sediment also often settles out of slow-moving or standing water in lakes and oceans. Desert sand dunes and loess are examples of aeolian transport and deposition. Glacial moraine deposits and till are ice transported sediments.

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