Measuring human impact on coastal ecosystems

Lush seagrass beds that support marine life, store carbon and prevent coastal erosion are on the decline due to such things as farming, aquaculture and coastal development.

Researcher discovers vegetarian sharks

She's never seen "Jaws" or heard "Mack the Knife," but don't underestimate Samantha Leigh's shark credentials. She knows how to hypnotize the creatures, analyze their blood and even take them on a two-hour car trip.

Nutrient pollution is changing sounds in the sea

Nutrient pollution emptying into seas from cities, towns and agricultural land is changing the sounds made by marine life – and potentially upsetting navigational cues for fish and other sea creatures, a new University ...

Protection of our marine life requires more resilience

Management of the world's marine habitats needs to look beyond only Marine Protected Areas and put achieving ecosystem resilience at the top of the agenda, according to research by an international group of scientists led ...

Bugs and slugs ideal houseguests for seagrass health

Marine "bugs and slugs" make ideal houseguests for valuable seagrass ecosystems. They gobble up algae that could smother the seagrass, keeping the habitat clean and healthy. That's according to results from an unprecedented ...

Solving the seagrass crisis

The world's seagrass meadows are in diabolical trouble – but Australian scientists say we can still save them if we act early, even as sea levels rise.

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