How scorpion venom could yield new cancer treatment

In the development of new drugs, taking something from nature and modifying it has been a successful tactic employed by medicinal chemists for years. Now, with the help of nanotechnology, researchers are turning once-discarded ...

Venom gets good buzz as potential cancer-fighter

Bee, snake or scorpion venom could form the basis of a new generation of cancer-fighting drugs, scientists will report here today. They have devised a method for targeting venom proteins specifically to malignant cells while ...

Meek male and fighting female scorpions

Threatened female bark scorpions sting quicker than males, likely to compensate for reduced ability to flee the threat, according to results published May 28, 2014, in the open access journal PLOS ONE by Bradley Carlson from ...

How a scorpion gets its sting

Defensins, as their name implies, are small proteins found in plants and animals that help ward off viral, bacterial or fungal pests. One fascinating question of invertebrate evolution is how these proteins evolved into venoms ...

Scorpions take sting out of pain

(Phys.org) —Australia is home to many venomous creatures and boasts some of the world's most deadly, but a particular group of venomous Aussies had been almost entirely ignored.

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