Gut microbes and humans on a joint evolutionary journey

The human gut microbiome is composed of thousands of different bacteria and archaea that vary widely between populations and individuals. Scientists from the Max Planck Institute for Biology in Tübingen have now discovered ...

New, non-invasive blood sugar testing methods using saliva

Despite breakthrough diabetes research over the past century, people with diabetes still need to rely on obtaining blood samples to monitor their sugar levels. Daily glucose monitoring by tracking blood sugar levels is essential ...

Licking a Tootsie Roll sensor to monitor health

Single-use diagnostic tests often aren't practical for health professionals or patients in resource-limited areas, where cost and waste disposal are big concerns. So, researchers reporting in ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces ...

New device can diagnose COVID-19 from saliva samples

Engineers at MIT and Harvard University have designed a small tabletop device that can detect SARS-CoV-2 from a saliva sample in about an hour. In a new study, they showed that the diagnostic is just as accurate as the PCR ...

Harnessing next generation sequencing to detect SARS-CoV-2

Researchers at the Vienna BioCenter designed a testing protocol for SARS-CoV-2 that can process tens of thousands of samples in less than 48 hours. The method, called SARSeq, is published in the journal Nature Communications ...

Are COVID-sniffing dogs the new tool in helping detect the virus?

Pandemic protocols and procedures are rapidly evolving as we learn more about getting the spread of COVID-19 under control. One new tool to help us track those infected with COVID-19 may be COVID-sniffing dogs. Dr. David ...

Researchers develop smartphone-based ovulation test

Investigators from Brigham and Women's Hospital are developing an automated, low-cost tool to predict a woman's ovulation and aid in family planning. Capitalizing on advancements in several areas, including microfluidics, ...

Blood spatters reveal a suspect's age through new technique

Researchers at King's College London have discovered a new method of forensic analysis which could more accurately predict the age of criminal suspects based on samples of blood and saliva found at crime scenes.

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