Swamp microbe has pollution-munching power

Sewage treatment may be an unglamorous job, but bacteria are happy to do it. Sewage plants rely on bacteria to remove environmental toxins from waste so that the processed water can be safely discharged into oceans and rivers.

Image: South Sudan

The Copernicus Sentinel-2B satellite takes us over South Sudan. Having gained independence from Sudan in July 2011, South Sudan is the youngest country in the world. It has an estimated population of 13 million people, more ...

Study indicates changing climate in the Australian South-East

Despite recent rainfall in parts of eastern Australia, a recently released scientific report indicates an increasing risk of below-average rainfall and runoff into streams, and drier conditions into the future in south-eastern ...

Recharge pond study reveals dynamics of water infiltration

(PhysOrg.com) -- An infiltration pond in California's Pajaro Valley has become a laboratory where scientists are working to improve techniques for recharging the region's depleted aquifer. Researchers at the University of ...

Smaller Colorado River projected for coming decades, study says

(Phys.org)—Some 40 million people depend on the Colorado River Basin for water but warmer weather from rising greenhouse gas levels and a growing population may signal water shortages ahead. In a new study in Nature Climate ...

Colorado county copes with methane mystery

(AP) -- Bernice and Jerry Angely like to show visitors the singed T-shirt a friend was wearing when their water well exploded and shot flames 30 feet high.

Rapid changes in the winter climate

The Baltic Sea winter climate has changed more in the last 500 years than previously thought. Research at the University of Gothenburg, Sweden, shows that our part of the world has experienced periods of both milder and colder ...

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