How flowers adapt to their pollinators

Flowering plants are characterized by an astonishing diversity of flowers of different shapes and sizes. This diversity has arisen in adaptation to selection imposed by different pollinators including, among others, bees, ...

Losing Nemo: clownfish 'cannot adapt to climate change'

The star of Pixar's blockbuster "Finding Nemo" may be about to vanish again—this time for good—as its peculiar mating habits put it at risk from climate change, scientists said on Tuesday.

A genetic tug-of-war between the sexes begets variation

In species with sexual reproduction, no two individuals are alike, and scientists have long struggled to understand why there is so much genetic variation. In a new study published in Nature Ecology & Evolution, a team of ...

Antidepressants polluting the water can change fish behavior

The Monash scientists who found that pharmaceutical pollutants in waterways altered reproductive behavior, anxiety levels, activity and antipredator responses of fish have now discovered for the first time that such toxicity ...

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Reproduction

Reproduction is the biological process by which new individual organisms are produced. Reproduction is a fundamental feature of all known life; each individual organism exists as the result of reproduction. The known methods of reproduction are broadly grouped into two main types: sexual and asexual.

In asexual reproduction, an individual can reproduce without involvement with another individual of that species. The division of a bacterial cell into two daughter cells is an example of asexual reproduction. Asexual reproduction is not, however, limited to single-celled organisms. Most plants have the ability to reproduce asexually.

Sexual reproduction requires the involvement of two individuals, typically one of each sex. Normal human reproduction is a common example of sexual reproduction.

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