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US-China trade war sparks worries about rare minerals

Rising trade tensions between the U.S. and China have sparked worries about the 17 exotic-sounding rare earth minerals needed for high-tech products like robotics, drones and electric cars.

US says to take action to ensure rare earths supply

The United States says it will take "unprecedented actions" to ensure the supply of strategic elements and rare earths, as China mulls possible export controls for materials that are critical to modern technology.

China steps up threat to deprive US of rare earths

Chinese state media dangled Wednesday the threat of cutting exports of rare earths to the United States as a counter-strike in the trade war, potentially depriving Washington of a key resource used to make everything from ...

Rare earths: the latest weapon in the US-China trade war

They are used in everything from lightbulbs to guided missiles, but with China controlling 95 percent of the world's supply of rare earth metals, they are also a potentially powerful weapon in Beijing's trade war with Washington.

New sensor detects rare metals used in smartphones

A more efficient and cost-effective way to detect lanthanides, the rare earth metals used in smartphones and other technologies, could be possible with a new protein-based sensor that changes its fluorescence when it binds ...

Electric cars can clean up the mining industry – here's how

Growing demand for electric vehicles is important to help cut transport emissions, but it will also lead to new mining. Without a careful approach, we could create new environmental damage while trying to solve an environmental ...

The complicated future of offshore wind power in the US

Over the past decade, wind power production in the U.S. has tripled, becoming the largest source of renewable energy in the country, the American Wind Energy Association has reported. There are more than 56,800 wind turbines ...

Researchers find potential new source of rare earth elements

Researchers have found a possible new source of rare earth elements—phosphate rock waste—and an environmentally friendly way to get them out, according to a study published in the Journal of Chemical Thermodynamics.

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