Researchers discover citrus greening affects roots before leaves

(Phys.org) —Although citrus greening enters trees through their leaves, University of Florida researchers have discovered that the deadly disease attacks roots long before the leaves show signs of damage – a finding that ...

Phloem production in Huanglongbing-affected citrus trees

Citrus Huanglongbing (citrus greening disease) is highly destructive and fast-spreading, contributing to a reduction in crop yields in Florida and threatening the future of the citrus industry worldwide. Once infected, trees ...

How safe is the enemy of a citrus-threatening pest?

The Asian citrus psyllid (ACP) can spread the lethal and incurable citrus disease known as huanglongbing (HLB) or citrus greening that threatens the multi-billion dollar global citrus industry. In Southern California, large ...

Asian bacteria threatens Florida oranges

Citrus production in Florida, the world's second largest orange juice supplier after Brazil, is being threatened by bacteria from Asia that has got scientists racing for a remedy.

New study offers hope for halting incurable citrus disease

The devastating disease Huonglongbing, or citrus greening, looms darkly over the United States, threatening to wipe out the nation's citrus industry, whose fresh fruit alone was valued at more than $3.4 billion in 2012.

Toxin-producing bacteria integrated into a pest insect

A small cicada-like insect called the Asian citrus psyllid (Diaphorina citri) threatens the world's citrus industries, transmitting an incurable and lethal citrus disease. This notorious pest harbors two bacterial species ...

Discovery could help save citrus from dreaded disease

A nutrition expert at UC Davis has discovered important clues to the deadly attack strategy of a puzzling plant pathogen that has destroyed hundreds of thousands acres of citrus across the world.

Biobased approaches examined in fight against zebra chip

Thanks to investigations by scientists-turned-detectives with the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) and other agencies, potato growers in the western United States and abroad now know the identities of the pathogen-insect ...

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