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Zooming across the political divide

Social psychologists at UCLA have done what seems impossible, at least on the internet: getting liberals and conservatives to have meaningful and congenial political discussions.

Study: How placentas evolved in mammals

The fossil record tells us about ancient life through the preserved remains of body parts like bones, teeth and turtle shells. But how to study the history of soft tissues and organs, which can decay quickly, leaving little ...

Maternal microbiome promotes healthy development of the baby

A mother's gut microbes can help in the development of the placenta, and the healthy growth of the baby—according to new research from the University of East Anglia, the Quadram Institute and the University of Cambridge.

There's more than one way to grow a baby

In his 1989 book Wonderful Life, evolutionary biologist Stephen Jay Gould famously argued that, if we could "replay the tape," life on Earth would evolve to be fundamentally different each time.

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Pregnancy

Pregnancy (latin graviditas) is the carrying of one or more offspring, known as a fetus or embryo, inside the uterus of a female. In a pregnancy, there can be multiple gestations, as in the case of twins or triplets. Human pregnancy is the most studied of all mammalian pregnancies. Obstetrics is the surgical field that studies and cares for high risk pregnancy. Midwifery is the non-surgical field that cares for pregnancy and pregnant women.

Childbirth usually occurs about 38 weeks after conception; i.e., approximately 40 weeks from the last normal menstrual period (LNMP) in humans. The World Health Organization defines normal term for delivery as between 37 weeks and 42 weeks. The calculation of this date involves the assumption of a regular 28-day period.

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