Related topics: prey

Ocean warming could hit shark survival

Infant sharks that live in the familiar mermaids' purses found on most beaches in the UK and throughout the world are more vulnerable to predation because of ocean warming, new research suggests.

To sting or not to sting? How bees organize defense behaviors

When do bees sting and how do they organize their collective defense behavior against predators? An interdisciplinary team of researchers from the Universities of Constance and Innsbruck has provided new insights into these ...

In wild soil, predatory bacteria grow faster than their prey

Predatory bacteria—bacteria that eat other bacteria—grow faster and consume more resources than non-predators in the same soil, according to a new study out this week from Northern Arizona University. These active predators, ...

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Predation

In ecology, predation describes a biological interaction where a predator (an organism that is hunting) feeds on its prey, (the organism that is attacked). Predators may or may not kill their prey prior to feeding on them, but the act of predation always results in the death of the prey. The other main category of consumption is detritivory, the consumption of dead organic material (detritus). It can at times be difficult to separate the two feeding behaviors, for example where parasitic species prey on a host organism and then lay their eggs on it for their offspring to feed on its decaying corpse. The key characteristic of predation however is the predator's direct impact on the prey population. On the other hand, detritivores simply eat what is available and have no direct impact on the "donor" organism(s).

Selective pressures imposed on one another has led to an evolutionary arms race between prey and predator, resulting in various antipredator adaptations.

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