More flavorful, healthful chocolate could be on its way

Chocolate has many health benefits—it can potentially lower blood pressure and cholesterol and reduce stroke risk. But just as connoisseurs thought it couldn't get any better, there's this tasty new tidbit: Researchers ...

Sticking power of plant polyphenols used in new coatings

A simple kitchen sink experiment helped Northwestern University researchers discover that green tea leaves not only can be used to steep a good cup of tea, but they make an excellent antibacterial coating, too.

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Polyphenol

Polyphenols (noun, pronunciation of the singular /pɑli'finəl/ or /pɑli'fɛnəl/) are a structural class of natural, synthetic, and semisynthetic organic chemicals characterized by the presence of large multiples of phenol structural units (right). The number and characteristics of these phenol structures underlie the unique physical, chemical, and biological (metabolic, toxic, therapeutic, etc.) properties of particular members of the polyphenol class. The name derives from poly-, from the ancient Greek word πολύς (polus, meaning “many, much”) and the word phenol which refers to a chemical structure formed by attaching to an aromatic benzenoid (phenyl) ring, an hydroxyl (-OH) group akin to that found in alcohols (hence the "-ol" suffix). The term polyphenol appears to have been in use since 1894.

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