Anomalous grooves on Martian moon Phobos explained by impacts

Some of the mysterious grooves on the surface of Mars' moon Phobos are the result of debris ejected by impacts eventually falling back onto the surface to form linear chains of craters, according to a new study.

A giant impact: Solving the mystery of how Mars' moons formed

Where did the two natural satellites of Mars, Phobos and Deimos, come from? For a long time, their shape suggested that they were asteroids captured by Mars. However, the shape and course of their orbits contradict this hypothesis. ...

In 40 million years, Mars may have a ring (and one fewer moon)

Nothing lasts forever - especially Phobos, one of the two small moons orbiting Mars. The moonlet is spiraling closer and closer to the Red Planet on its way toward an inevitable collision with its host. But a new study suggests ...

Mars' moon Phobos is slowly falling apart

The long, shallow grooves lining the surface of Phobos are likely early signs of the structural failure that will ultimately destroy this moon of Mars.

Japan announces plans to send probe to Martian moon

Japan's space agency JAXA has announced its intention to send a spacecraft to one of Mar's moons, collect a sample from its surface and then return to Earth to allow for analyzing the sample. If successful, it would be the ...

Is Phobos doomed?

"All these worlds are yours except Europa, attempt no landing there."

The case for a mission to Mars' moon Phobos

Ask any space enthusiast, and almost anyone will say humankind's ultimate destination is Mars. But NASA is currently gearing up to go to an asteroid. While the space agency says its Asteroid Initiative will help in the eventual ...

ESA image: Phobos and Jupiter align

(Phys.org) —Even though it may only be a lump of porous rock, Phobos isn't shy about hogging the limelight in this sequence taken by ESA's Mars Express. These three images show Phobos, the larger of the two martian moons, ...

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