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Europe powers up for third and fourth Orion spacecraft

Europe will power the NASA spacecraft that take astronauts to a new international outpost and forward to the moon, following decisions made by ESA Member States at Space19+ in Seville, Spain.

Image: Thermal enclosure for Orion

The Orion spacecraft with European Service Module at NASA's Plum Brook Station. The first Orion will fly farther from Earth on the Artemis I mission than any human-rated vehicle has ever flown before—but first it will undergo ...

Image: European Service Module 2 assembly

The European Service Module-2 (ESM-2) is somewhat like the portal it appears to be in this image. By providing power and propulsion for the Orion spacecraft, it will transport humans back to the Moon, roughly fifty years ...

Gateway to the moon

The International Space Station partners have endorsed plans to continue the development of the Gateway, an outpost around the moon that will act as a base to support both robots and astronauts exploring the lunar surface.

HD video from the moon in near real time

A new optical modem, capable of sending high-definition quality video significantly faster than standard radio frequency systems, is being developed for NASA's Orion spacecraft. The hardware, offered by LGS Innovations, is ...

Goodbye Europe, hello Moon: European Module ships soon

The European Service Module that will power and propel the Orion spacecraft on its first mission around the moon will ship early next week from Bremen to the United States. It will take off in an Antonov An-124 aircraft in ...

Orion's first Service Module integration complete

Last week at the Airbus integration hall in Bremen, Germany, technicians installed the last radiator on the European Service Module for NASA's Orion spacecraft marking the module's finished integration.

Image: The Orion test crew capsule

NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine (second from left) tours the Orion test crew capsule for the Ascent Abort-2 (AA-2) test, with Orion AA-2 Crew Module Manager Dr. Jon Olansen, left, NASA Johnson Space Center Director Mark ...

Shake those wings

The solar arrays that will provide electricity to the Orion spacecraft were put through launch-day paces at ESA's Test Centre in the Netherlands to verify that they can handle the rigours of the trip around the Moon.

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