Cutting through fog with laser focus

Research from The University of Queensland aimed at controlling light in scattering materials, such as fog or biological tissues, will benefit future biomedical imaging and telecommunications.

Submarine cables: billions of potential seismic sensors

Scientists have for the first time shown that it is possible to detect the propagation of seismic waves on the seafloor using submarine telecommunications cables. According to their observations, this existing infrastructure ...

VTT developed an optical fiber made of cellulose

VTT researchers were able to transmit light in wood-based fibre. Optical fibre made of cellulose is best suited for sensors that benefit from the biodegradability of the material. In the future, optical cellulose fibre may ...

LHCb looks to the future with SciFi detector

For the LHCb detector at the Large Hadron Collider, the ongoing second long shutdown (LS2) of CERN's accelerator complex will be a period of metamorphosis. After two successful data-collection runs, the detector is being ...

Why you should care about better fiber optics

Fibre optic research can give us better medical equipment, improved environmental monitoring, more media channels—and maybe better solar panels.

Data transfer by controlled noise

In information technology, multiplexing schemes are used to transmit more signals than the number of available transmission channels. Researchers at ETH in Zurich have invented a novel method whereby information is encoded ...

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