Related topics: health officials

California wildfire smoke blankets parts of Canada

Smoke from California and Oregon wildfires has cloaked Canada's third-largest city of Vancouver—known for its majestic mountain views and fresh ocean breezes—in the dirtiest air in the world this week.

Massive damage of rare plants probed at Nevada mine site

State and federal authorities are investigating the mysterious loss of a significant swath of a rare desert wildflower that's being considered for federal protection at a contentious mine site in Nevada with some of the largest ...

'Paulette' makes rare landfall in Bermuda, grows to Cat 2

Hurricane Paulette made a rare landfall in Bermuda Monday and strengthened into a Category 2 storm just hours after the wealthy British territory shuttered schools, government agencies and air and sea ports.

US gears for rising death toll in West Coast wildfires

US officials girded Saturday for the possibility of mass fatalities from raging wildfires up and down the West Coast, as evacuees recounted the pain of leaving everything behind in the face of fast-moving flames.

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Official

An official is someone who holds an office (function or mandate, regardless whether it carries an actual working space with it) in an organization or government and participates in the exercise of authority (either his own or that of his superior and/or employer, public or legally private).

A government official or functionary is an official who is involved in public administration or government, through either election, appointment, selection, or employment. A bureaucrat is a member of the bureaucracy. An elected official is a person who is an official by virtue of an election. Officials may also be appointed ex officio (by virtue of another office, often in a specified capacity, such as presiding, advisory, secretary). Some official positions may be inherited.

A person who currently holds an office is referred to as an incumbent.

The word official as a noun has been recorded since the Middle English period, first seen in 1314.[citation needed] It comes from the Old French official (12th century), from the Latin officialis ("attendant to a magistrate, public official"), the noun use of the original adjective officialis ("of or belonging to duty, service, or office") from officium ("office"). The meaning "person in charge of some public work or duty" was first recorded in 1555. The adjective is first attested in English in 1533, via the Old French oficial.

The informal term officialese, the jargon of "officialdom", was first recorded in 1884.

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