Political polarization? Don't blame the web, study says

Despite the popular narrative that the web is to blame for rising political polarization, a study by a Brown University economist has found that recent growth in polarization is greatest for demographic groups in which individuals ...

Republicans and Democrats tend to follow news in similar ways

Republicans and Democrats are very much alike in the ways they follow the news despite their differing opinions of the media, according to a report released today by the Media Insight Project, a collaboration of the American ...

Arrest in NSA news leak fuels debate on source protection

It was a major scoop for The Intercept— documents suggesting a concerted Russian effort to hack US election systems—but the online news site is drawing fire in media circles following the arrest of the alleged source ...

China to launch own encyclopaedia to rival Wikipedia

China plans to launch its own online encyclopaedia next year, hoping to build a "cultural Great Wall" that can rival Wikipedia as a go-to information source for Chinese Internet users who Beijing fears are being corrupted ...

Political polarization? Don't blame the web, study says

A study by a Brown University economist has found that recent growth in political polarization is largest for demographic groups in which individuals are least likely to use the internet and social media—a finding that ...

Study illustrates Facebook's growth as campaign news source

Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton voters had different media diets, but a study finds common ground in Facebook as an important news source—even if their individual feeds bore little resemblance to each other's.

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