Related topics: brain · spinal cord · nerve cells · blood vessels · pain

Why developing nerve cells can take a wrong turn

A group of scientists from CECAD has found a mechanism by which neurodevelopmental diseases concerning neurons can be explained. The loss of a certain enzyme, UBE2K, impedes the differentiation of stem cells by silencing ...

Lighting the path for cells

ETH researchers have developed a new method in which they use light to draw patterns of molecules that guide living cells. The approach allows for a closer look at the development of multicellular organisms—and in the future ...

Lipid metabolism controls brain development

Neural stem cells are not only responsible for early brain development—they remain active for an entire lifetime. They divide and continually generate new nerve cells and enable the brain to constantly adapt to new demands. ...

Worm nerve responses for good and bad

Nagoya University researchers and colleagues have revealed the nerve circuitry regulating the response of a tiny soil worm to changing temperatures. The findings, published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy ...

Biologists investigate the role of the largest animal brain cells

The brains of most fish and amphibian species contain two types of conspicuously large nerve cells. These are the largest cells found in any animal brain. They are called Mauthner cells and trigger lightning-fast escape responses ...

page 1 from 51

Nerve

A nerve is an enclosed, cable-like bundle of peripheral axons (the long, slender projections of neurons). A nerve provides a common pathway for the electrochemical nerve impulses that are transmitted along each of the axons. Nerves are found only in the peripheral nervous system. In the central nervous system, the analogous structures are known as tracts. Neurons are sometimes called nerve cells, though this term is technically inaccurate since many neurons do not form nerves, and nerves also include non-neuronal Schwann cells that coat the axons in myelin.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA