Natural geological methane emissions appear larger than expected

Geological methane sources can be either anthropogenic or natural, such as the oil industry or mud volcanoes. Ground-based measurements combined with TROPOMI observations on the Javanese mud volcano Lusi now show that the ...

Observing the development of a deep-sea greenhouse gas filter

In a long-term study, marine scientists from Bremen have for the first time observed the slow colonization of the crater around a deep-sea mud volcano after its eruption. The first settlers are tiny organisms that eat methane ...

Masses of methane from mud volcanoes

In the seabed, there are numerous microorganisms that play an important role in the global carbon cycle. Until now, however, it has not been understood to what extent geodynamic processes such as the subduction of oceanic ...

Scientists determine source of world's largest mud eruption

On May 29, 2006, mud started erupting from several sites on the Indonesian island of Java. Boiling mud, water, rocks and gas poured from newly-created vents in the ground, burying entire towns and compelling many Indonesians ...

Earthquake not to blame for Indonesian mud volcano

New research led by the University of Adelaide hopes to close the debate on whether a major mud volcano disaster in Indonesia was triggered by an earthquake or had man-made origins.

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