Can a moss help clean up waterways?

Hydrocarbons from our cars, oil spills and industrial contamination can get into our waterways by many paths. Researchers recently studied if a common "willow moss" could work to soak up these hydrocarbons, and clean up waterways.

Climate and currents shaped Japan's hunter-gatherer cultures

The island prefecture of Hokkaidō, Japan's second-largest island, has a rich cultural history of hunter-gatherers both on land and at sea. Over thousands of years through the Holocene and into the 19th century, the prevalence ...

The hidden talents of mosses and lichens

Tropical rainforests are the world's most significant source of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs). These compounds have a great influence on the concentration of oxidative substances and thus on the self-purifying ...

Researchers discover the secret of how moss spreads

University of Copenhagen researchers have discovered how mosses became one of our planet's most widely distributed plants—global wind systems transport them along Earth's latitudes, to rooftops, sidewalks and lawns worldwide, ...

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Moss

Mosses are small, soft plants that are typically 1–10 cm (0.4–4 in) tall, though some species are much larger. They commonly grow close together in clumps or mats in damp or shady locations. They do not have flowers or seeds, and their simple leaves cover the thin wiry stems. At certain times mosses produce spore capsules which may appear as beak-like capsules borne aloft on thin stalks.

There are approximately 12,000 species of moss classified in the Bryophyta. The division Bryophyta formerly included not only mosses, but also liverworts and hornworts. These other two groups of bryophytes now are often placed in their own divisions.

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