Reducing air pollution 'could prevent 50,000 EU deaths'

Limiting air pollution to levels recommended by the World Health Organization could prevent more than 50,000 deaths in Europe annually, according to research published Wednesday that called for urgent action.

Urban heat and mortality: Who are the most vulnerable?

Climate change has and will continue to induce severe increases in summer temperatures throughout Europe, especially in the Mediterranean region, where Italy stands out in terms of heat-related effects on daily mortality. ...

Scientists unravel how and why Amazon trees die

The capacity of the Amazon forest to store carbon in a changing climate will ultimately be determined by how fast trees die—and what kills them. Now, a huge new study has unravelled what factors control tree mortality rates ...

Violent encounters between gorillas slow population growth rate

As wildlife populations decline around the globe, understanding the natural and human-induced factors that influence their growth is critical for determining the risk of population declines and developing effective conservation ...

Effective government saves lives in cyclones, other disasters

In 2008, Cyclone Nargis killed more than 138,000 people in Myanmar. It was a powerful category 3 or 4 storm at landfall, but tropical storms with similar wind speeds that year resulted in far fewer fatalities in other countries.

Thinning and prescribed fire treatments reduce tree mortality

To date in 2020, 1,217 wildfires have burned 1,473,522 million acres of National Forest System lands in California; 8,486 wildfires have burned over 4 million acres across all jurisdictions in California. This current fire ...

Researchers classify lesion from trichomonosis in birds

Oral avian trichomonosis is an infection caused by parasitic protozoon Trichomonas gallinae. By infecting mainly the oropharyngeal and crop mucosa, the severe lesions can cause the death of the birds due to suffocation or ...

Chronically understudied, fences hold grave ecological threats

Fences are one of humanity's most frequent landscape alterations, with their combined length exceeding even that of roads by an order of magnitude. Despite their ubiquity, they have received far less research scrutiny than ...

page 1 from 29

Mortality rate

Mortality rate is a measure of the number of deaths (in general, or due to a specific cause) in some population, scaled to the size of that population, per unit time. Mortality rate is typically expressed in units of deaths per 1000 individuals per year; thus, a mortality rate of 9.5 in a population of 100,000 would mean 950 deaths per year in that entire population. It is distinct from morbidity rate, which refers to the number of individuals in poor health during a given time period (the prevalence rate) or the number who currently have that disease (the incidence rate), scaled to the size of the population.

One distinguishes:

In regard to the success or failure of medical treatment or procedures, one would also distinguish:

Note that the crude death rate as defined above and applied to a whole population can give a misleading impression. The crude death rate depends on the age (and gender) specific mortality rates and the age (and gender) distribution of the population. The number of deaths per 1000 people can be higher for developed nations than in less-developed countries, despite life expectancy being higher in developed countries due to standards of health being better. This happens because developed countries typically have a completely different population age distribution, with a much higher proportion of older people, due to both lower recent birth rates and lower mortality rates. A more complete picture of mortality is given by a life table which shows the mortality rate separately for each age. A life table is necessary to give a good estimate of life expectancy.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA