The Loch Ness monster: A modern history

Reports of Loch Ness monster sightings keep coming. The latest report, accompanied by a video, is of a 20–30ft long creature occasionally breaking the water's surface. Although the video clearly shows a moving v-shaped ...

Researchers control elusive spin fluctuations in 2-D magnets

Like Bigfoot and the Loch Ness monster, critical spin fluctuations in a magnetic system haven't been captured on film. Unlike the fabled creatures, these fluctuations—which are highly correlated electron spin patterns—do ...

The mysterious 'Tully Monster' fossil just got more mysterious

Every now and again, scientists discover fossils that are so bizarre they defy classification, their body plans unlike any other living animals or plants. Tullimonstrum (also known as the Tully Monster), a 300m-year-old fossil ...

Could the Loch Ness monster be a giant eel?

Is the Loch Ness monster a shark? A giant catfish? A sturgeon? No, it's a giant eel! Or at least it could be, according to a study published on Thursday.

Tsunami-safe Gulf is nothing but, experts warn

A major oil tanker expressway in the Persian Gulf once thought a low-risk area is actually a 'highly vulnerable hotspot' for monster waves, new research reveals.

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