Charles Darwin and conspicuous consumption: Why bling is blingy

Luxury brands are a prominent feature of modern society. Thorstein Veblen coined the term "conspicuous consumption" to describe how the upper classes showcased expensive goods without inherent practical benefits to demonstrate ...

Luxury consumption can fuel 'impostor syndrome' among some buyers

Purchasing luxury goods can affirm buyers' sense of status and enjoyment of items like fancy cars or fine jewelry. However, for many consumers, luxury purchases can fail to ring true, sparking feelings of inauthenticity that ...

Luxuriating in aspiration

Many people enjoy luxury and those that don't have access to luxury goods and services often aspire to it. Writing in the International Journal of Indian Culture and Business Management, a team explain how in the "West" the ...

When political ideology shapes luxury buying

Political allegiance plays a critical role in the decision to buy luxury goods. New empirical research by David Dubois, associate professor of marketing at INSEAD, Jeehye Christine Kim of Hong Kong UST Business School and ...

Personality drives purchasing of luxury goods

People who are extraverted and on low incomes buy more luxury goods than their introverted peers to compensate for the experience of low financial status, finds new UCL research.

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