Related topics: cancer · cancer cells · chemotherapy · patients · smokers

20,000 premature US deaths caused by human-ignited fires

Over 80% of premature deaths caused by small smoke particles in the United States result directly from human-ignited fires. This is the outcome of a study published today in IOP Publishing's journal Environmental Research ...

The proteins that fix (almost) everything

Proteins can make any inventor green with envy. It is proteins that make the body work. But when these same super-substances make mistakes, we may get sick with things like cancer or Alzheimer's disease. The job of researchers ...

Human fetal lung cell atlas uncovers 144 cell states

The developing human lung has been mapped in unprecedented detail, identifying 144 cell states in the early stages of life, and uncovering new links between developmental cells and lung cancer.

Nanosensors target enzymes to monitor and study cancer

Cancer is characterized by a number of key biological processes known as the "hallmarks of cancer," which remodel cells and their immediate environment so that tumors can form, grow, and thrive. Many of these changes are ...

Nanoparticles train immune cells to fight cancer

Scientists in the department of Advanced Organ Bioengineering and Therapeutics (Faculty of S&T, TechMed Centre) recently published a novel cancer immune therapy in the scientific journal Nature Communications. In their research, ...

Scaling up cell imaging

Scientists have learned a lot about human biology by looking at cells under a microscope, but they might not notice tiny differences between cells or even know what they're looking for. Researchers at the Broad Institute ...

How cells zip through the stickiest mucus

A team led by Johns Hopkins University engineers figured out how and why human cells move much faster through thick mucus than thinner varieties. People sick with certain diseases, including asthma and COVID-19, secrete mucus ...

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Lung cancer

Lung cancer is a disease of uncontrolled cell growth in tissues of the lung. This growth may lead to metastasis, which is the invasion of adjacent tissue and infiltration beyond the lungs. The vast majority of primary lung cancers are carcinomas of the lung, derived from epithelial cells. Lung cancer, the most common cause of cancer-related death in men and the second most common in women (after breast cancer), is responsible for 1.3 million deaths worldwide annually. The most common symptoms are shortness of breath, coughing (including coughing up blood), and weight loss.

The main types of lung cancer are small cell lung carcinoma and non-small cell lung carcinoma. This distinction is important, because the treatment varies; non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) is sometimes treated with surgery, while small cell lung carcinoma (SCLC) usually responds better to chemotherapy and radiation. The most common cause of lung cancer is long-term exposure to tobacco smoke. The occurrence of lung cancer in nonsmokers, who account for as many as 15% of cases , is often attributed to a combination of genetic factors, radon gas, asbestos, and air pollution, including secondhand smoke.

Lung cancer may be seen on chest radiograph and computed tomography (CT scan). The diagnosis is confirmed with a biopsy. This is usually performed via bronchoscopy or CT-guided biopsy. Treatment and prognosis depend upon the histological type of cancer, the stage (degree of spread), and the patient's performance status. Possible treatments include surgery, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy. With treatment, the five-year survival rate is 14%.

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