USDA-ARS releases genome of the voracious desert locust

The first high-quality genome of the desert locust—those voracious feeders of plague and devastation infamy and the most destructive migratory insect in the world—has been produced by U.S. Department of Agriculture Agricultural ...

Examining why locusts form destructive swarms

Researchers at Tel Aviv University found that the microbiome of a solitary locust undergoes a profound change when the host joins a group: bacteria called Weissella, almost completely absent from the microbiome of solitary ...

Desert locusts remain a serious threat to Pakistan

In 2019 and 2020, desert locusts once again plagued parts of East Africa and huge areas as far as India and Pakistan through the Arabian Peninsula, in an infestation that was described as the worst in decades. A serious agricultural ...

An irresistible scent makes locusts swarm, study finds

The coronavirus isn't the only plague making headlines this year—locusts are devastating crops in several parts of the world, and now scientists are discovering why the pest forms destructive swarms.

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Locust

Locusts are the swarming phase of short-horned grasshoppers of the family Acrididae. These are species that can breed rapidly under suitable conditions and subsequently become gregarious and migratory. They form bands as nymphs and swarms as adults—both of which can travel great distances, rapidly stripping fields and greatly damaging crops.

The origin and apparent extinction of certain species of locust – some of which reached 6 inches (150 mm) in length – are unclear.

Locusts are an edible insect and are considered a delicacy in some countries and throughout history.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA