Colugos glide to save time, not energy

Gripping tightly to a tree trunk, at first sight a colugo might be mistaken for a lemur. However, when this animal leaps it launches into a graceful glide, spreading wide the enormous membrane that spans its legs and tail ...

Sir Richard's possible folly

Moving animals, like the ring-tailed lemur, from one continent to another to save the species hasn't been done often and typically isn’t successful.

Interview: Branson says island may save lemurs

(AP) -- Billionaire entrepreneur Richard Branson plans to create a colony of lemurs on an undeveloped island he owns in the Caribbean, saying Monday it's a "radical idea" to save an endangered primate that is disappearing ...

Age affects us all

Humans aren't the only ones who grow old gracefully, says a new study of primate aging patterns. For a long time it was thought that humans, with our relatively long life spans and access to modern medicine, aged more slowly ...

New lemur: big feet, long tongue and the size of squirrel

(PhysOrg.com) -- A species of fork-marked lemur believed to be new to science was discovered in the dry forests of Madagascar. It will be shown for the first time exclusively on BBC's "Decade of Discovery" special program ...

Lemur play is on solid ground

Unless it leads to sex, adult male primates usually aren't very playful. Except if they’re Silky sifakas.

Researchers provide new understanding of bizarre extinct mammal

University of Florida researchers presenting new fossil evidence of an exceptionally well-preserved 55-million-year-old North American mammal have found it shares a common ancestor with rodents and primates, including humans.

Hormonal birth control alters scent communication in primates

Hormonal contraceptives change the ways captive ring-tailed lemurs relate to one another both socially and sexually, according to a Duke University study that combined analyses of hormones, genes, scent chemicals and behavior.

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