Mapping trees can help count endangered lemurs

The vast majority of lemur species are on the edge of extinction, experts warn. But not every lemur species faces a grim future. There may be as many as 1.3 million white-fronted brown lemurs still in the wild, for example, ...

The endangered species list: counting lemurs in Madagascar

Most people are familiar with the endangered species list. Officially known as the IUCN Red List of threatened species, it's coordinated by the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN) and provides the most ...

Madagascar's lemurs use millipedes for their tummy troubles

Madagascar's red-fronted lemurs may have a secret weapon from nature's medicine cabinet: millipedes. This is according to a study led by Louise Peckre of the German Primate Center at the Leibniz Institute for Primate Research ...

page 1 from 13

Lemur

Lemurs make up the infraorder Lemuriformes and are members of a group of primates known as strepsirrhines, endemic to the island of Madagascar. The term "lemur" is derived from the Latin word lemures, meaning "spirits of the night" or "ghosts". This likely refers to their large, reflective eyes and the wailing cries of some species (the Indri in particular). The term is generically used for the members of the five lemuriform families, but it is also the genus of one of the lemuriform species, the Ring-tailed Lemur (Lemur catta). The two so-called flying lemur species, known formally as colugos, are not lemurs or even primates.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA