How chewing like a cow helped early mammals thrive

You probably haven't given much thought to how you chew, but the jaw structure and mechanics of almost all modern mammals may have something to do with why we're here today. In a new paper published this week in Scientific ...

Early fossil fish from China shows where our jaws came from

Where did our jaws come from? The question is more complicated than it seems, because not all jaws are the same. In a new article, published in Science, palaeontologists from China and Sweden trace our jaws back to the extinct ...

Ancient fish illuminates one of the mysteries of childhood

Remember dropping your milk teeth? After a lot of wiggling the tooth finally dropped out. But in your hand was only the enamel-covered crown: the entire root of the tooth had somehow disappeared. In a paper published in Nature, ...

A Jurassic world of salamanders

Salamanders are fairly adorable, but often forgotten, animals. Because their skeletons are pretty delicate, the fossil record for this group is spotty, with many ancient forms known only from vertebrae or jaw bones. As ...

Amateur paleontologist finds rare fossil of fish in Arizona

Growing up, Stephanie Leco often would dig in her backyard and imagine finding fossils of a tyrannosaurus rex. She was fascinated with the idea of holding something in her hand that was millions of years old and would give ...

'Shape-shifting' material could help reconstruct faces

Injuries, birth defects (such as cleft palates) or surgery to remove a tumor can create gaps in bone that are too large to heal naturally. And when they occur in the head, face or jaw, these bone defects can dramatically ...

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