Primordial goo used to improve implants

Australia's national science research organisation, CSIRO, has developed an innovative new coating that could be used to improve medical devices and implants, thanks to a "goo" thought to be have been home to the building ...

Antimicrobial film for future implants

The implantation of medical devices is not without risks. Bacterial or fungal infections can occur and the body's strong immune response may lead to the rejection of the implant. Researchers at Unit 1121 "Biomaterials and ...

Researchers create fatigue-free, stretchable conductor

Researchers have discovered a new stretchable, transparent conductor that can be folded or stretched and released, resulting in a large curvature or a significant strain, at least 10,000 times without showing signs of fatigue.

Cancer decoy could attract, capture malignant cells

A small, implantable device that researchers are calling a cancer "super-attractor" could eventually give doctors earlier warnings of relapse in breast cancer patients and even slow the disease's spread to other organs.

Wafer-thin material heralds future of wearable technology

UOW's Institute for Superconducting and Electronic Materials (ISEM) has successfully pioneered a way to construct a flexible, foldable and lightweight energy storage device that provides the building blocks for next-generation ...

Designing better medical implants

Biomedical devices that can be implanted in the body for drug delivery, tissue engineering, or sensing can help improve treatment for many diseases. However, such devices are often susceptible to attack by the immune system, ...

Toward 24-7 glucose monitoring to help manage diabetes

Nearly half a million people with diabetes end up in emergency rooms around the U.S. every year due to the seizures and other consequences of dropping or spiking blood-sugar levels associated with the disease. To help prevent ...

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