Related topics: plos one · genes

Molecules that promote plant-to-plant communications below ground

Plants have evolved elaborate mechanisms for detecting neighboring plants, which typically involve the perception of "cues'" inadvertently produced by their neighbors. Strigolactones are hormonal signaling molecules that ...

No, the human brain did not shrink 3,000 years ago: research

Did the 12th century B.C.E.—a time when humans were forging great empires and developing new forms of written text—coincide with an evolutionary reduction in brain size? Think again, says a UNLV-led team of researchers ...

How do plants adapt to aquatic environments?

The theory that life began in the ocean is widely accepted. The public, however, does not acknowledge the reality that many aquatic organisms are descendants of terrestrial organisms. Whales and dolphins are marine mammals ...

Which rules evolutionary change: Life or climate?

The fossil record over the last half a billion years shows biodiversity as a zigzagging pattern of species births and extinctions. For decades scientist have attempted to answer the question: Which rules supreme—life or ...

Showing that species thrive through social connections

The term biodiversity invites images of lush rainforests, dynamic estuaries, and other biomes where a kaleidoscope of species interact within their communities. We could assume the same holds true for biodiversity at the microscopic level.

A quantum drum that stores quantum states for record-long times

Researchers at the Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, have improved the coherence time of a previously developed quantum membrane dramatically. The improvement will expand the usability of the membrane for a ...

Study argues that language may not shape social outcomes

Does language shape thought? Do the languages we speak affect how we live our lives? These are some of the oldest questions in the cognitive and social sciences, and a handful of high-profile research articles in the social ...

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Hypothesis

A hypothesis (from Greek ὑπόθεσις [iˈpoθesis]) consists either of a suggested explanation for an observable phenomenon or of a reasoned proposal predicting a possible causal correlation among multiple phenomena. The term derives from the Greek, hypotithenai meaning "to put under" or "to suppose." The scientific method requires that one can test a scientific hypothesis. Scientists generally base such hypotheses on previous observations or on extensions of scientific theories. Even though the words "hypothesis" and "theory" are often used synonymously in common and informal usage, a scientific hypothesis is not the same as a scientific theory. A hypothesis is never to be stated as a question, but always as a statement with an explanation following it. It is not to be a question because it states what the experimenter thinks will occur. Hypotheses are usually written in the "if-then form": If X, then Y.

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