For hyenas, there's no 'I' in clan

When it comes to advancing social status, it's not what you know, it's who you know—for humans and spotted hyenas alike.

Hyena population recovers slowly from a disease epidemic

Infectious diseases can substantially reduce the size of wildlife populations, thereby affecting both the dynamics of ecosystems and biodiversity. Predicting the long-term consequences of epidemics is thus essential for conservation. ...

Mobs are, sometimes, good

Submitting to mob mentality is always a risky endeavor, for humans or hyenas. A new Michigan State University study focusing on the latter, though, shows that when it comes to battling for food, mobbing can be beneficial.

Dino dinner, dead or alive

When asked to think of meat-eating dinosaurs we usually conjure images of voracious predators chasing down helpless prey. These visions are no doubt inspired by the depiction of species such as Tyrannosaurs rex and Velociraptor ...

Researchers reconsider roles of second-rank hyena males

Males that don't leave home are not second-class, but can breed as successfully as their more adventurous competitors that leave home, according to a new long-term study on spotted hyenas. The results from a research team ...

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