Simplified voice box enriches human speech

An ongoing debate among scientists, on why chimpanzees and other nonhuman primates cannot speak or sing like humans, has focused mainly on evolutionary changes in human brain development. Attention has now expanded to anatomical ...

Creating eco-friendly sound absorbers from seaweed

From airplanes to apartments, most spaces are now designed with sound-absorbing materials that help dampen the droning, echoing and murmuring sounds of everyday life. But most of the acoustic materials that can cancel out ...

Studying primates to learn about the evolution of speech

Speech and language skills are unique to modern humans. While this ability evolved over millions of years, it is not possible to trace language in the fossil record because it leaves no direct imprint. Instead, re-examining ...

The case for speaking politely to animals

How we speak matters to animals. Horses, pigs and wild horses can distinguish between negative and positive sounds from their fellow species and near relatives, as well as from human speech, according to new research in behavioral ...

Women seen as happy and men as angry despite real emotions

Faces and voices are more likely to be judged as male when they are angry, and as female when they are happy, new University of Essex research has revealed. The study led by Dr. Sebastian Korb found that how we understand ...

Baby seals can change their tone of voice

Hoover the "talking seal" famously imitated human speech. But can baby seals already adapt their voices to sounds? Researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics in Nijmegen, the Free University of Brussels ...

A new perspective on the genomes of archaic humans

A genome by itself is like a recipe without a chef—full of important information, but in need of interpretation. So, even though we have sequenced genomes of our nearest extinct relatives—the Neanderthals and the Denisovans—there ...

Cows prefer "live" co-moo-nication, study reveals

After months of technology-based communication enforced by COVID-19, many of us are missing a "live" human voice. But we're not the only ones—a new study reveals that cows also prefer a face-to-face chat. The research, ...

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