The cell's skeleton in motion

To many of us, cells are the building blocks of life, akin to bricks or Legos. But to biologist Regan Moore, a former Ph.D. student in Dan Kiehart's lab at Duke, cells are so much more: they're busy construction sites, machinery ...

Electrons take the fast and slow lanes at the same time

Imagine a road with two lanes in each direction. One lane is for slow cars, and the other is for fast ones. For electrons moving along a quantum wire, researchers in Cambridge and Frankfurt have discovered that there are ...

New method simultaneously measures flow and oxygen

An international research team headed by the Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology in Bremen, Aarhus University and the Science for Life Lab in Uppsala has developed tiny particles that measure the oxygen concentration ...

Quantum one-way street in topological insulator nanowires

Very thin wires made of a topological insulator could enable highly stable qubits, the building blocks of future quantum computers. Scientists see a new result in topological insulator devices as an important step towards ...

New study sheds light on early human hair evolution

Hair is an important feature of primate—including human—diversity and evolution, serving functions tied to thermoregulation, protection, camouflage and signaling. However, the evolution of wild primate hair remained relatively ...

Chemists use DNA to build the world's tiniest antenna

Researchers at Université de Montréal have created a nanoantenna to monitor the motions of proteins. Reported this week in Nature Methods, the device is a new method to monitor the structural change of proteins over time—and ...

Changing old polymers for use in new applications

The use of plastics on a daily basis is inherent to modern life. The most produced and utilized family of plastics are polyolefins, which are used in packaging materials, toys, lawn chairs, and extremely strong fibers and ...

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