Related topics: bees

Honeybees are math stars (Update)

Start thinking about numbers and they can become large very quickly. The diameter of the universe is about 8.8×1023 km and the largest number with a name—googolplex, 1010100—outranks it enormously. Although that colossal ...

A combination of insecticides and mites weakens honeybees

Today, scientists at the Institute of Bee Health of the University of Bern and the honeybee research association COLOSS have published an article in the peer-reviewed journal Scientific Reports that shows a synergistic time-lag ...

Honeybees found to have rightward bias under certain circumstances

Entomologist Thomas O'Shea-Wheller with Louisiana State University has found that under certain circumstances, honeybees demonstrate a rightward bias. In his paper published in the journal Biology Letters, he describes experiments ...

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Honey bee

Apis andreniformis Apis florea, or dwarf honey bee

Apis dorsata, or giant honey bee

Apis cerana, or eastern honey bee Apis koschevnikovi Apis mellifera, or western honey bee Apis nigrocincta

Honey bees (or honeybees) are a subset of bees, primarily distinguished by the production and storage of honey and the construction of perennial, colonial nests out of wax. Honey bees are the only extant members of the tribe Apini, all in the genus Apis. Currently, there are only seven recognized species of honey bee with a total of 44 subspecies (Engel, 1999) though historically, anywhere from six to eleven species have been recognized. Honey bees represent only a small fraction of the approximately 20,000 known species of bees. Some other types of related bees produce and store honey, but only members of the genus Apis are true honey bees.

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