Related topics: bees

How effective are honey bees as pollinators?

Honeybees are celebrated as effective plant pollinators, but just how effective are they? Newly published UC Davis research in the American Journal of Botany yields some surprising results.

To sting or not to sting? How bees organize defense behaviors

When do bees sting and how do they organize their collective defense behavior against predators? An interdisciplinary team of researchers from the Universities of Constance and Innsbruck has provided new insights into these ...

Introduced honeybee may pose threat to native bees

A Curtin University study has found the introduced European honeybee could lead to native bee population decline or extinction when colonies compete for the same nectar and pollen sources in urban gardens and areas of bush.

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Honey bee

Apis andreniformis Apis florea, or dwarf honey bee

Apis dorsata, or giant honey bee

Apis cerana, or eastern honey bee Apis koschevnikovi Apis mellifera, or western honey bee Apis nigrocincta

Honey bees (or honeybees) are a subset of bees, primarily distinguished by the production and storage of honey and the construction of perennial, colonial nests out of wax. Honey bees are the only extant members of the tribe Apini, all in the genus Apis. Currently, there are only seven recognized species of honey bee with a total of 44 subspecies (Engel, 1999) though historically, anywhere from six to eleven species have been recognized. Honey bees represent only a small fraction of the approximately 20,000 known species of bees. Some other types of related bees produce and store honey, but only members of the genus Apis are true honey bees.

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