Related topics: plos one · bees

Climatic drivers of honey bee disease revealed

Honey bee colonies worldwide have suffered from a range of damaging diseases. A new study has provided clues on how changing weather patterns might be driving disease in UK colonies.

Origin of rare, healthy sugar found in stingless bee honey

The mystery of what creates the rare, healthy sugar found in stingless bee honey, has been solved by researchers at The University of Queensland, in collaboration with Queensland Health Forensic and Scientific Services.

Next-generation sequencing uncovers what's stressing bumblebees

What's stressing out bumblebees? To find out, York University scientists used next-generation sequencing to look deep inside bumblebees for evidence of pesticide exposure, including neonicotinoids, as well as pathogens, and ...

Honey bee behavior from within the hive

Unique video from within beehives provides special insight into honey bee behaviors, according to a study published March 17, 2021 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Paul Siefert from Goethe-Universität, Germany, and ...

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Honey bee

Apis andreniformis Apis florea, or dwarf honey bee

Apis dorsata, or giant honey bee

Apis cerana, or eastern honey bee Apis koschevnikovi Apis mellifera, or western honey bee Apis nigrocincta

Honey bees (or honeybees) are a subset of bees, primarily distinguished by the production and storage of honey and the construction of perennial, colonial nests out of wax. Honey bees are the only extant members of the tribe Apini, all in the genus Apis. Currently, there are only seven recognized species of honey bee with a total of 44 subspecies (Engel, 1999) though historically, anywhere from six to eleven species have been recognized. Honey bees represent only a small fraction of the approximately 20,000 known species of bees. Some other types of related bees produce and store honey, but only members of the genus Apis are true honey bees.

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