Heritage science: Where the past looks to the future

Are crowd-sourced photos taken with mobile phones useful in collecting analytics for antiques? Can smell be used to classify degradation of plastic artifacts in museums? How are cannonballs from shipwrecks affected by conservation ...

The science of preserving Henry VIII's 1200+ cannonballs

In a ground-breaking partnership between The Mary Rose, UCL and Diamond Light Source, the Mary Rose's Head of Conservation, Dr. Eleanor Schofield and her colleagues are working at the cutting edge of conservation science ...

What is a heritage turkey?

Over 45 million turkeys are eaten by Americans each Thanksgiving, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Hunters provide some—last autumn, about 24,000 wild turkeys were harvested in Pennsylvania. Vegetarians ...

Loss of wild insects hurts crops around the world

Researchers studying data from 600 fields in 20 countries have found that managed honey bees are not as successful at pollinating crops as wild insects, primarily wild bees, suggesting the continuing loss of wild insects ...

Controversial dam removals founded on value conflicts

Researchers at Umeå University conclude that public opposition to dam removal is not based on knowledge deficiency, as is sometimes argued in dam removal science. It is instead a case of different understandings and valuation ...

Dried squash holds headless French king's blood, study finds

Two centuries after the French people beheaded Louis XVI and dipped their handkerchiefs in his blood, scientists believe they have authenticated the remains of one such rag kept as a revolutionary souvenir.

The quest for new cancer-fighting drugs in marine environments

(Phys.org)—Human beings have been using wild plants to cure their ills for thousands of years. While much of the focus has been on the medicinal properties of terrestrial plants, one UConn researcher is exploring a new ...

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