Related topics: head injuries

Chemist develops a new catalyst for oxidation and amidation

A RUDN chemist has obtained a compound with a new structural type containing atoms of metals (copper and sodium) in a carcass structure and that is shaped like a bicycle helmet. The compound shows catalytic activity in two ...

Researchers show air bag bike helmets have promise

Stanford bioengineer David Camarillo knows all too well that bicycling is the leading cause of sports- and activity-related concussion and brain injury in the United States. He's had two concussions as the result of bicycling ...

Smart helmets save lives, improve rides

As technological advancements enable people to run faster, ride farther and hit harder, experts are using sensors to collect data that could reduce head trauma incidents for football, hockey, cycling and other sports.

Video: What's in a football helmet?

Football is back, and with all the hard hits and tough tackles come renewed concerns about safety. Every NFL player is required to wear a helmet, but the helmets of today are a far cry from the leather creations from decades ...

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Helmet

A helmet is a form of protective gear worn on the head to protect it from injuries.

Ceremonial or symbolic helmets (e.g., English policeman's helmet) without protective function are sometimes used. The oldest known use of helmets was by Assyrian soldiers in 900BC, who wore thick leather or bronze helmets to protect the head from blunt object and sword blows and arrow strikes in combat. Soldiers still wear helmets, now often made from lightweight plastic materials.

In civilian life, helmets are used for recreational activities and sports (e.g., jockeys in horse racing, American football, ice hockey, cricket, baseball, and rock climbing); dangerous work activities (e.g., construction, mining, riot police); and transportation (e.g., Motorcycle helmets and bicycle helmets). Since the 1990s, most helmets are made from resin or plastic, which may be reinforced with fibers such as aramids.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA