Questions in quantum computing—how to move electrons with light

Electronics rely on the movement of negatively-charged electrons. Physicists strive to understand the forces that push these particles into motion, with the goal of harnessing their power in new technologies. Quantum computers, ...

Scientists observe a new form of strange matter

In a discovery that could provide new insights into the origin of mass in the universe following the Big Bang, scientists from the international J-PARC E15 Collaboration, led by researchers from the RIKEN Cluster for Pioneering ...

An exoplanet loses its atmosphere in the form of a tail

A new study led by scientists from the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias (IAC) reveals that the giant exoplanet WASP-69b carries a comet-like tail made up of helium particles escaping from its gravitational field and ...

Cryocooler cools an accelerator cavity

Particle accelerators are made of structures called cavities, which impart energy to the particle beam, kicking it forward. One type of cavity is the superconducting radio-frequency, or SRF, cavity. Usually made of niobium, ...

Cosmic collisions at the LHCb experiment

Last week at the 52nd Rencontres de Moriond EW in La Thuile, Italy, the LHCb experiment presented the results of an unprecedented and unusual study. Instead of the usual proton-proton collisions, this time the LHCb detector ...

Researchers simulate helium bubble behavior in fusion reactors

One of the most important challenges for successful commercialization of fusion power is the development of materials that can tolerate the extreme conditions of elevated temperatures and high particle flux of hydrogen isotopes ...

LHC celebrates five years of not destroying the world

Five years ago, at breakfast time, the world waited anxiously for news from CERN, the European Organization for Nuclear Research. The first nervy bunch of protons were due to be fired around the European lab's latest and ...

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